Yael Vishnizki Levi

Ivory Tower
2011
Installation, seven sandbags, wood, fabric, iron candlestick
(W)

The title of Yael Vishnitzki Levis work, Ivory Tower, is a reference to the Song of Solomon (7:4), one of the scrolls of the last section of the Hebrew bible, which in modern Judaism is read on the Sabbath over Passover, commemorating the Exodus from Egypt: ›Your neck islike an ivory tower‹. The reference hints at both the noble purity of ivory as a valuable luxury material both in the Jewish and Christian traditions and the erectness of the neck, holding the head up, facing proudly or stoically whatever might happen.

What we see is a tower made of sandbags—a fragile construction, balancing a board on top that resembles either an ironing board or a ship’s ramp. On top of all, there is a white ironed cloth and an iron candlestick standing on the board.

According to the artist, the tower is ›resembling a lighthouse in the sea‹. A metaphor for flight and rescue, a context in which the materials gain further meanings. The sandbags are often used to build protective barriers against floods, the cloth and the candlestick become elements one might assume having been kept as a memory or heritage and grabbed hastily before escape.

Yael Vishnizki Levi (*1988), studied art and philosophy, lives and works in Lublin and Warsaw.

    Yael Vishnizki Levi: › Ivory Tower‹, 2011, installation, seven sandbags, wood, fabric, iron candlestick. Photo: Małgorzata Kujda
    Yael Vishnizki Levi: › Ivory Tower‹, 2011, installation, seven sandbags, wood, fabric, iron candlestick. Photo: Małgorzata Kujda
    Exhibition view Muzeum Współczesne Wrocław. Photo: Małgorzata Kujda
    Exhibition view Muzeum Współczesne Wrocław. Photo: Małgorzata Kujda